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Grad student reaches youth with art – The Daily Cougar

Grad student reaches youth with art – The Daily Cougar

After a step into El Franco Lee II’s cubicle and a gaze at the unfinished paintings that line the wall, you will realize his art is unique. As a UH graduate student, Lee conveys the realities of humanity. “I’m going off of instinct and what feels good to me,” he said. “My drive is just …

Source: Grad student reaches youth with art – The Daily Cougar

After a step into El Franco Lee II’s cubicle and a gaze at the unfinished paintings that line the wall, you will realize his art is unique.
As a UH graduate student, Lee conveys the realities of humanity.

“I’m going off of instinct and what feels good to me,” he said.
“My drive is just imagery I’ve had in my head for years.”
Lee’s paintings capture the human struggle by broaching topics that many are afraid to visit.
“James Byrd 1” is one of Lee’s works and depicts the dragging death of the subject in gory detail.
The visual it gives you is derogatory, but so is the hate-filled event it represents.
Also included in Lee’s studio is a powerful message regarding Hurricane Katrina and the racially-charged controversy surrounding it back in 2005.
It portrays the distress of ordinary citizens juxtaposed with the carelessness and callousness of the officers involved who are pointing guns at them while eating sandwiches.
Whether you agree or disagree with the characterization, “Bayou Classic” draws you in. And that is the point, according to Lee.
The aspiring artist uses art to pay homage to his favorite figures in music and sports; he is currently working on a piece that includes all members of the Houston-based rap group Screwed Up Click.
Lee is driven and focused to succeed.
“(I enjoy) the history you can create because it’s layer after layer and blood, sweat and tears. It’s nights and just passion put into building this imagery,” Lee said.
“Even if you get tired of the subject matter you’re dealing with, you’ve got to keep going and make yourself love it as it starts to form the way you’ve been envisioning it in your head.”
As a function of his hard work, Lee’s work has been featured on all three coasts in shows across the nation.
With only three semesters remaining towards attaining his master’s, Lee began teaching fundamentals of art courses at UH this semester.
“I like teaching quite a bit. It took me by surprise,” Lee said.
“I’m driven by watching the students draw and seeing how well they do and how much better they get from the time they start the course.”
Lee hopes to bring a new voice to his community, which he believes has undervalued art as a whole.
“Sad enough my work really doesn’t get to be seen by the people that it can really affect and that it really relates to,” Lee said.
“I love the reaction from the youth because hate it or love it, the people that have been embracing the work have no idea about the context behind it.”
arts@thedailycougar.com

Tags: Art, Blaffer Art Museum, El Franco Lee II, racism

One of El Franco Lee’s paintings depicts the natural disaster known as Hurricane Katrina that made landfall in late-August 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. | Courtesy of El Franco Lee II

Nola Chic

Native of New Orleans, who endured 20yrs cruel Minnesota Cold, I decided at 42yrs old it was time to pack up my then 6yr old and come back to my roots. I am all things that would challenge the belief of growing up in New Orleans. I was a 16yr old teen mother of a preterm 2lb baby girl born with a disability. With the help of my mother who had her own struggles. We survived the obstacles laid before us. I'm the proud mother of three children with two failed adoptions, as well as a grandmother of three, two grandsons and a granddaughter. I survived two abusive marriages. I successfully ran a soulfood restaurant and catering company in Minnesota for 12 years. I started creating custom cakes after the murder of my beloved cousin Melvin Paul.  He survived Katrina only to go to Minneapolis six months later to be murdered over a parking spot dispute.  I put my all into my cake business over the years as House of Cakes was started right out of my house in honor of him. I thought by having the big house on the hill, a husband, having a family, foster/adoptive mother at that, being involved in all things that matter, plus having the funds to match would cure me in a sense; but most of it poisoned my heart and soul. I had a broken heart and I felt deep down the only way to repair it was to get back to my roots, my soul, my home,  myself, my New Orleans. I'm here and I'm loving it. Even being in the so called Blighted Area of New Orleans and not having all the financial and material security, I'm happy. I am determined that She, yes New Orleans is a woman is just like me; together we will overcome and will rise from all that tried to kill our spirit. Nothing like starting from the bottom and making your way back up! I'm down in the boot, but I know I have a nice floppy hat awaiting my destiny...

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