fbpx

Lil Wayne Releases Long-Awaited ‘Tha Carter V’ – Rolling Stone

After years of delays, the rapper’s latest album is finally here

“Carter V is Everything!!!”

Lil Wayne released his much-delayed and highly anticipated Tha Carter V album on Thursday at midnight.

Tha Carter V features rapping from Kendrick Lamar, Travis Scott and Snoop Dogg, singing from Nicki Minaj, Ashanti and Nivea, and vocals from XXXTentacion, who was shot and killed earlier this year. The final song includes a prominent sample of the English singer Sampha. Production on the album comes courtesy of longtime collaborator Mannie Fresh, Swizz Beatz, Metro Boomin, Ben Billions and many others.

This album has been a long time coming: Lil Wayne first announced Tha Carter V in 2012, following the 2011 release of Tha Carter IV. But the fifth installment of Wayne’s series, which began in 2004 when he was just 22, was mired in label delays for over five years.

The album was first supposed to come out in 2014; Drake joined Wayne on “Believe Me,” which was going to be the lead single. Days before a possible December release date, however, Wayne took to Twitter to announce that his mentor and Cash Money label head Brian “Birdman” Williams “refuse[d] to release” the album. “I am a prisoner and so is my creativity,” Wayne tweeted at the time. “I am truly sorry and I don’t blame ya if ya fed up with waiting 4 me & this album,” he added.

“Tha Carter V” – with 23 tracks – gave the Twitterverse lots to post about. On the first song, “I Love You Dwayne,” Wayne’s mother weeps with pride for her son, an emotional moment that resonated with people on the social media site.

Check out @_unclesauce’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/_unclesauce/status/1045546235149447168?s=09
“Wayne’s Mom on this intro though,” a person tweeted, adding the “I don’t know why I’m crying in the club right now” meme.

View image on Twitter
“Bruh my heart when Lil Wayne’s mom cries,” another user shared.

In January of 2015, Wayne sued Cash Money, demanding $51 million and the right to sever his ties with the label. Later that year, when the rapper attempted to release another project, the Free Weezy Album, through Jay-Z’s streaming service Tidal, Cash Money reportedly hit back by suing Tidal for $50 million, though this suit was allegedly filed improperly and eventually dropped.

According to a recent Billboard cover story, the legal disputes between Wayne and Birdman have now been settled for an undisclosed sum, clearing the way for the release of Tha Carter V. As part of the deal, Wayne is now the sole owner of Young Money Records, his imprint, which was previously a subsidiary of Cash Money. He also maintains his own relationship with Universal Music Group, which has distributed Cash Money releases for two decades.

It’s unclear when the bulk of Tha Carter V was recorded; Wayne is a notoriously prolific studio rat, and the album has presumably been in the works since its announcement. However, he was reportedly still recording this week.

That may have played a part in yet another delay: Tha Carter V was initially expected last Friday. The album did not appear — Lil Wayne called it “a misunderstanding” — but this week, the rapper posted a countdown clock on his website which ticked down to Thursday at midnight. He also released a grateful video thanking his fans for their continued support. “I would like for y’all to know that since y’all stuck with me for like the last four or five years, through all of this, y’all got me feeling like Tiger Woods with this comeback,” Wayne said.

The release of Tha Carter V gives Wayne two reasons to celebrate: He also turned 36 on Thursday.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/lil-wayne-carter-v-730344/

A native of New Orleans, who left her beloved New Orleans to spend twenty years of living in the land of Minnesota Not So Nice. Minnesota was full of opportunities but would learn that the soul of the state and the people who made it was just as icy cold as the temperatures. After the years and my 40th birthday flew by, I decided it was time to pack up my youngest child and come back to my roots, my birthplace the city that not only birthed me but gave me life. I would not be who I am without my New Orleans beginnings. I am all things that would challenge the belief of growing up in New Orleans. I was a 16yr old teen mother of a premature baby born with a severe medical disability. And only With the help of my mother, was it possible for me to BE! I was able to endure and survive the obstacles laid before my child and me. In a city that was built by my family, but did not allow for us to reap the benefits I overcame. Charity Hospital was my second home — a building filled with miracle workers who made it possible for my daughter to have life. I have lived a life of rainy days with peeks of sunshine, that are my children, including those not of my womb. I'm the proud mother of three and a grandmother of three. My dream was to live the life of the nursery rhyme of ”The Old Lady Who lived in a shoe,” and for the most part, I did. I cared for several children over the years as a special needs foster parent. I would learn that my love was not enough for some children, but I loved them through their pain. I'm not sure if I ever had a case of true love or came close to what love looks like on television, but I had my share of men and the mirage of love. I survived two abusive marriages. Though I longed to return to New Orleans on a daily bases, I must admit my move was one of the best decisions made for me. I am a college graduate; I was a successful entrepreneur. I coowned a soul food restaurant and catering company in Minnesota for 12 years. I developed the talent of creating custom cakes after the murder of my beloved cousin Melvin Paul. He survived Katrina only to go to Minneapolis six months later to be murdered over a parking spot dispute. But with the challenge of creating a simple wedding cake, I was able to find healing. I created the House of Cakes in honor of him. Minnesota life had me pretty materialistic. I worked to the point I do not remember much, but work and handing my children love money. I thought by having the big house on the hill, a husband, having a family, the ultimate provider and being involved in all things that matter, plus having the funds to match would cure me of what I was told was a generational curse of lack of everything from money, love to even self-love. But for the most part, that life poisoned my heart and soul. I was blinded by visions fed to me by the media. I was told I wasn't anything unless I was better than the Jones's. I lived being ok with a broken, bleeding heart. Life like this did not exist in my family while living in New Orleans from what I viewed with my eyes and soul. We may not have had all the things I acquired over the years, but we were happy, we were together. Family outside of New Orleans wasn't family anymore. We lived separate lives and had awkward moments when we bumped into each other in public. I hated living in Minnesota even though life their helped me in so many ways. I felt deep down the only way to repair it was to get back to my roots, my soul, my home, myself, my New Orleans. I'm here, and I love it. Even being in the so-called Blighted Area of New Orleans and not having all the financial and material security, I'm happy. I am determined that She, yes, New Orleans is a woman is just like me; together, we will overcome and will rise from all that tried to kill our spirit. Nothing like starting from the bottom and making your way back up!. I just know in my heart that New Orleans will provide for me. There's a bank account with funds in it owed to me by way of back pay for my ancestors. And I will receive my inheritance, and I will continue the traditions and customs of the old to keep the heartbeat of New Orleans beating. I'm down in the boot, living the life that feels right to me awaiting my destiny...

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: