fbpx

  Treme/7th Ward Arts & Culture Festival  May 25-27

Treme/7th Ward Arts & Culture Festival
When: May 25-27
There are neighborhood tours, a Baby Doll bar crawl, community art projects, youth activities, food and music by Shannon Powell, Treme Brass Band, Kermit Ruffins and others at the fest under the Claiborne Avenue overpass. Visit http://www.treme7thwardcd.org for details. 9:30 a.m. Friday, noon Saturday-Sunday.
 About

Long known as bedrocks of indigenous art, culture, and history, the Tremé and 7th Ward neighborhoods will be celebrated for their immeasurable contributions—to the City of New Orleans, the United States, and the world—at the 3rd Annual Tremé/7th Ward Arts & Culture Festival this Memorial Day Weekend, May 25 – 27, 2018.

We, the people of Tremé and 7th Ward have survived and thrived by knowing our History, living our Traditions, and forever innovating our Culture, while creating Music, Dance, Food, Art, Architecture, and Scholarship to inspire all humanity.

The first of many new activities to activate the Tremé/7th Ward Cultural District, our T7 Fest will spotlight our neighborhoods, together and individually, for our rich historical sites, our unique cultural products, and the quality, character, and proud ancestry of our residents.

Join us as we Take It to the Streets…

We will kick off Friday, May 25 with high-spirited tours of historic sites in both the Tremé and 7th Ward neighborhoods exploring the traditions, history, and culture of both neighborhoods in a global context.

The history continues into the night with the T7 Baby Doll Bar Crawl, as we explore another community tradition of “bar hopping” to 5 historic bars and taverns in the Tremé and 7th Ward neighborhoods. These are the places where born and bred New Orleans musicians hone their talents, where performing artists perfect their vocals, masking Indians practice their chants, and community cooks and craftspeople hawk their wares.

But don’t stay out too late! Because after you’ve visited the historic sites and survived the bar crawl, now it’s time to experience what all the talk is about, when we Take It to the Streets…

All day Saturday, May 26 we meet Under the Bridge between the Saints Streets, Saint Ann to Saint Phillip at our free arts and culture festival. The world’s best musicians will take the stage, the world’s best culinary artists will cook, the world’s best fine artists and craftspeople will create, the world’s best community organizations will educate and engage.

It all leads back to our life-sustaining, spirit fulfilling culture, began before the founding of America, by communities of enslaved Africans and Free People of Color.  We’ll be celebrating on Sunday, May 27 with more back to back music ending with a traditional New Orleans Secondline.

And when it’s all said and done, it’ll have been said and done by people who live and love the art and culture…it’s on!

Tremé / 7th Ward Cultural District

COPYRIGHT © 2015 TREMÉ / 7TH WARD CULTURAL DISTRICT ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

A native of New Orleans, who left her beloved New Orleans to spend twenty years of living in the land of Minnesota Not So Nice. Minnesota was full of opportunities but would learn that the soul of the state and the people who made it was just as icy cold as the temperatures. After the years and my 40th birthday flew by, I decided it was time to pack up my youngest child and come back to my roots, my birthplace the city that not only birthed me but gave me life. I would not be who I am without my New Orleans beginnings. I am all things that would challenge the belief of growing up in New Orleans. I was a 16yr old teen mother of a premature baby born with a severe medical disability. And only With the help of my mother, was it possible for me to BE! I was able to endure and survive the obstacles laid before my child and me. In a city that was built by my family, but did not allow for us to reap the benefits I overcame. Charity Hospital was my second home — a building filled with miracle workers who made it possible for my daughter to have life. I have lived a life of rainy days with peeks of sunshine, that are my children, including those not of my womb. I'm the proud mother of three and a grandmother of three. My dream was to live the life of the nursery rhyme of ”The Old Lady Who lived in a shoe,” and for the most part, I did. I cared for several children over the years as a special needs foster parent. I would learn that my love was not enough for some children, but I loved them through their pain. I'm not sure if I ever had a case of true love or came close to what love looks like on television, but I had my share of men and the mirage of love. I survived two abusive marriages. Though I longed to return to New Orleans on a daily bases, I must admit my move was one of the best decisions made for me. I am a college graduate; I was a successful entrepreneur. I coowned a soul food restaurant and catering company in Minnesota for 12 years. I developed the talent of creating custom cakes after the murder of my beloved cousin Melvin Paul. He survived Katrina only to go to Minneapolis six months later to be murdered over a parking spot dispute. But with the challenge of creating a simple wedding cake, I was able to find healing. I created the House of Cakes in honor of him. Minnesota life had me pretty materialistic. I worked to the point I do not remember much, but work and handing my children love money. I thought by having the big house on the hill, a husband, having a family, the ultimate provider and being involved in all things that matter, plus having the funds to match would cure me of what I was told was a generational curse of lack of everything from money, love to even self-love. But for the most part, that life poisoned my heart and soul. I was blinded by visions fed to me by the media. I was told I wasn't anything unless I was better than the Jones's. I lived being ok with a broken, bleeding heart. Life like this did not exist in my family while living in New Orleans from what I viewed with my eyes and soul. We may not have had all the things I acquired over the years, but we were happy, we were together. Family outside of New Orleans wasn't family anymore. We lived separate lives and had awkward moments when we bumped into each other in public. I hated living in Minnesota even though life their helped me in so many ways. I felt deep down the only way to repair it was to get back to my roots, my soul, my home, myself, my New Orleans. I'm here, and I love it. Even being in the so-called Blighted Area of New Orleans and not having all the financial and material security, I'm happy. I am determined that She, yes, New Orleans is a woman is just like me; together, we will overcome and will rise from all that tried to kill our spirit. Nothing like starting from the bottom and making your way back up!. I just know in my heart that New Orleans will provide for me. There's a bank account with funds in it owed to me by way of back pay for my ancestors. And I will receive my inheritance, and I will continue the traditions and customs of the old to keep the heartbeat of New Orleans beating. I'm down in the boot, living the life that feels right to me awaiting my destiny...

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: