Women’s History: The hidden history of black nationalist women’s political activism/https://theconversation.com/us

January 30, 2018 6.33am EST Black History Month is an opportunity to reflect on the historical contributions of black people in the United States. Too often, however, this history focuses on black men, sidelining black women and diminishing their contributions.  … Continue reading Women’s History: The hidden history of black nationalist women’s political activism/https://theconversation.com/us

Women in New Orleans History: Honoring the life of Hattie McCray

“Defending Her Honor.” Defending her honor, Protecting her name, She fell, bullet wounded— Thank God but not in Shame! She fell warding off A beastly attack, A sterling young woman, Even though she was black. Defending her honor, Protecting her name, She fought for her virtue, And died for the same.85 Written by Ivy Lenoir Continue reading Women in New Orleans History: Honoring the life of Hattie McCray

The 14 Times Mardi Gras was Effected in NOLA History

NEW ORLEANS—Mardi Gras is a fire that rages in the heart of New Orleans. It’s a fire that is difficult to extinguish and like a phoenix, it returns every year. Emily Perkins and Katherine Jolliff Dunn from The Historic New Orleans Collection followed the 14 times the city decided to let the good times rest. To check out their article, click here. “There have been 14 years since 1857 that Mardi Gras has been cancelled or significantly scaled back. The first year was in 1862 at the start of the occupation of New Orleans during the American Civil War. It … Continue reading The 14 Times Mardi Gras was Effected in NOLA History

Free and Nonwhite: Les Gens de Couleur Libres in Antebellum New Orleans

Join us at Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses for this fascinating lecture on free people of color living in antebellum New Orleans (1803 -1865). Our special guest is Kimberley Coleman, and the lecture will be virtual and free to the public with registration. Kim Coleman is a native New Orleanian, historian, and storyteller. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Dillard University in History and a Master of Arts degree from Southern University at New Orleans in Museum Studies. As the Curator and Director of Interpretation at the McKenna Museums, Kim has combined her love of history and art … Continue reading Free and Nonwhite: Les Gens de Couleur Libres in Antebellum New Orleans

Celebrating the partnership of Kenneth & Melba Ferdinand of Café Rose Nicaud

On Monday, December 16, 2019, family, friends, and customers of Café Rose Nicaud came together to celebrate The Ferinand’s retirement and the business’s closure after 25 years in operation. I had the opportunity to celebrate true love, dedication, and commitment … Continue reading Celebrating the partnership of Kenneth & Melba Ferdinand of Café Rose Nicaud

New Orleans and Haiti are linked by culture, food and history

When you walk around New Orleans, you can see the Haitian influence everywhere, from the creole cottages to the jambalaya. And thousands of New Orleanians trace their ancestry back to the island. This connection had one journalist asking, is the feeling mutual? — Read on http://www.pri.org/stories/2017-10-27/new-orleans-and-haiti-are-linked-culture-food-and-history Continue reading New Orleans and Haiti are linked by culture, food and history

Crack Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed By David Farber

Crack is an essential read for anyone hoping to understand why. This lively, well- researched history of America’s crack cocaine years introduces readers to entrepreneurial dealers, desperate users, and draconian drug policies. Along the way, it illuminates the era’s racism, political excesses, and media exaggerations, as well as the lasting damage crack and crack dealers wrought in countless neighborhoods of color. Continue reading Crack Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed By David Farber

ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune November 1, 1865

“ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune, America’s first Black daily, 154 years ago. “The ancients, who seem to have been more familiar than ourselves with the idea of death, and perhaps more constantly ready to meet the monster and look it in the face…” Read the full article below. “This day is devoted, among many families, to honor the memory of departed friends. The old custom will be observed this year as it has been years before. Either as the expression of a religious sentiment, or even as a social sentiment, it has a high character of morality. The … Continue reading ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune November 1, 1865

My Bittersweet Pickaninny Dolls: New Orleans Vintage Gambina Dolls, Ninkie, and Jody circa 1700s

The dolls reminded me of the painful memories and difficulties growing up in New Orleans with what I was told was the wrong color skin and bad short hair, the only difference was that “Ninkie” was cute and only because she was made in the 80. A lot of my feelings were rooted not in hatred for myself but for the absence of dolls that looked like me. Continue reading My Bittersweet Pickaninny Dolls: New Orleans Vintage Gambina Dolls, Ninkie, and Jody circa 1700s