Growing Up In New Orleans- Latch Key Kids On The Bus

We were raised to appreciate the cultures that make New Orleans so eccentric and magical. When My Mama and Daddy was off they really made up for the time they spent away from us, especially My Mama. We frequented festivals, art museums, parks, fancy restaurants (I started eating raw oysters at 6yrs old) and random walks through the city. Even though we were raised Baptist, we visited churches of different denominations. Both my sister and I played the violin and other extracurricular activities. I was an honor roll student throughout high school. Yes, Growing Up in New Orleans as a Latch Key Kid in New Orleans riding on the Bus was was tough and scary at times, but knowing that I we were left alone for a greater purpose made it worth it.

A personal review of Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed by David Farber

The government used crack cocaine as a double edge sword that severed the lives of all who came into contact with it. The book is filled with interviews that speak of the quick road to riches, being out of the projects, and the hopes of a better life for their family only to be greeted by “DEATH” awaiting them around the next corner. Crack cocaine was marketed as “HOPE,” but there was a”DEATH” clause written in small print, but Farber’s “CRACK: Rock Cocaine, Street capitalism, and the Decade of Greed” brings the magnifying glass to help you read what you missed over the years.

Review of Sidewalk Food Tour New Orleans

My neighbor and I had a wonderful time. We both were born and raised in New Orleans and learned so much about our city that we did not know. It’s something how you can live somewhere all your life and not know about some of its important histories. It felt like we were on an adult field trip! I loved meeting the tourists and hearing about their love for my beloved city. It all was absolutely fabulous!

Remembering Big Queen Kim “Cutie” Boutte

Big Queen Kim’s life was dedicated to the Black Masking Indian culture (once known as Mardi Gras Indians) since the age of five with the Mandingo Warriors and Spirit of Fi Yi Yi. Her Uncle and Big Chief Harris’s voice radiated over the crowd as he and Big Queen Kim’s spirit lead us back to Solider’s Field as he shouted, “She was My Queen!” during the vigil on Wednesday, August 12th. It was a beautiful evening as hundreds of people packed the streets of Treme to honor our beloved Queen’s life. “She loved the culture,” says Big Chief Victor.

Robert Hillary King, Member of the Angola Three: Ending Solitary Confinement

A member of the Angola Three, Robert King will discuss his 29 years in solitary confinement and his work since being released in 2001 to end human rights abuses in American prison and to reform the U.S. justice system. Findings of two new reports on solitary confinement in Louisiana prisons, where incarcerated people are held in solitary at FOUR times the national rate, and how to plug into the Louisiana Stop Solitary Coalition will also be discussed.

Exciting news…. looks like Albert Woodfox, the other surviving member of the Angola Three, may be able to join Mr. King! Albert Woodfox just learned on Wednesday that his book, Solitary: My Story of Transformation and Hope, has just been chosen as a finalist for the 2019 National Book Award!