My Family’s Christmas Cooking Tradition: Chitlins aka Chitterlings with the recipe

Chitterlings are part of my childhood memories my mom and sister both taught me their recipe, my version is a combination of both. The smell reminds me of getting ready to go to my Auntie or my Momo house. Continue reading My Family’s Christmas Cooking Tradition: Chitlins aka Chitterlings with the recipe

Réveillon Menus at Seaworthy and Josephine Estelle at Ace Hotel New Orleans

It’s December and we have kicked off the Réveillon season in New Orleans. Réveillon, French for Awakening, was celebrated by Creoles after Christmas Eve mass in New Orleans in the 1800s. Local restaurants serve the famous repast throughout the month of December. You are invited to be a part of the celebration and continue the tradition at the Seaworthy and Josephine Estelle at the Ace … Continue reading Réveillon Menus at Seaworthy and Josephine Estelle at Ace Hotel New Orleans

Smothered with Love at Hurst Restaurant – Garden & Gun

Felton Hurst Sr., their son, worked as a skycap before he stepped into the lead cook role in 1994. Now seventy-six, he arrives six days a week before seven to stand alongside his wife, Marilyn, smothering pork parts and cooking down pots of greens. Flavored with smoked neck bones and pickled pig tails, his hand-torn and long-simmered greens are as good as any I’ve ever … Continue reading Smothered with Love at Hurst Restaurant – Garden & Gun

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A Traditional New Orleans Monday Dinner is Red Beans & Rice; Recipe Included

What I love about the history of cooking Red Beans and Rice is that is was about survival, making something taste good out of a little of nothing. You can feed a family of 4-6 people with one bag of red beans and the parts of meat what was known as throw away parts back in the days of slavery and segregation. Continue reading A Traditional New Orleans Monday Dinner is Red Beans & Rice; Recipe Included

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Black-Owned Restaurants in New Orleans

There’s not one city in America; I would say the world but, there’s no place other than New Orleans that dishes up some of the best food. My city is a big ole flavorful pot of gumbo infused by different cultures such as African American, Native American, Caribbean, French, Spaniard, and Italians. But in my eyes Everything began with a group of American Indians who … Continue reading Black-Owned Restaurants in New Orleans

How New Orleans Celebrates Its Dead – The New York Times

The funeral for Leah Chase, a chef and civil rights icon, showcased a street culture that continues to flourish in the city she helped revive. — Read on http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/06/13/us/new-orleans-funerals.html Continue reading How New Orleans Celebrates Its Dead – The New York Times

Steamy Okra Gumbo Art Print by Elaine Hodges

Let’s talk New Orleans Gumbo! The history of Gumbo

The name “Gumbo” derives from a West African word for okra, suggesting that gumbo was originally made with okra. The use of filé (dried and ground sassafras leaves) was a contribution of the Choctaws and, possibly, other local tribes. Roux has its origin in French cuisine. Gumbo is closely associated with a melting pot of Louisiana cooking, but New Orleans is known for having the … Continue reading Let’s talk New Orleans Gumbo! The history of Gumbo

NOLA Chic's Gumbo

Let’s talk New Orleans Gumbo!!! NOLA Chic Cooking Class Part #l

Join me in my New Orleans kitchen as I go through the step of making my Grandmother’s Gumbo recipe that she passed on to my Mama, who passed it on to me.  I’m excited to share a part of my family’s New Orleans cooking tradition and culture. Every Christmas, well every holiday and or special occasion in just about every New Orleans household Gumbo is … Continue reading Let’s talk New Orleans Gumbo!!! NOLA Chic Cooking Class Part #l