What Is Mardi Gras? The REAL History & Traditions Explained by Newtral Groundz

We live in a world where everyone likes to party. Everywhere you turn you see events taking place dedicated solely to getting on your level. None of those match the level of America’s biggest party season, Mardi Gras. Mardi Gras / Shrove Tuesday / Fat Tuesday “Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday is always 47 days before Easter. Carnival season begins on Jan. 6, Twelfth Night, the Christian holy day of the Epiphany, and ends with Mardi Gras. It’s a celebration of life that precedes the fasting and simple living during the Christian season of Lent. Because Easter is variable, Mardi … Continue reading What Is Mardi Gras? The REAL History & Traditions Explained by Newtral Groundz

Free and Nonwhite: Les Gens de Couleur Libres in Antebellum New Orleans

Join us at Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses for this fascinating lecture on free people of color living in antebellum New Orleans (1803 -1865). Our special guest is Kimberley Coleman, and the lecture will be virtual and free to the public with registration. Kim Coleman is a native New Orleanian, historian, and storyteller. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Dillard University in History and a Master of Arts degree from Southern University at New Orleans in Museum Studies. As the Curator and Director of Interpretation at the McKenna Museums, Kim has combined her love of history and art … Continue reading Free and Nonwhite: Les Gens de Couleur Libres in Antebellum New Orleans

A personal review of Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed by David Farber

The government used crack cocaine as a double edge sword that severed the lives of all who came into contact with it. The book is filled with interviews that speak of the quick road to riches, being out of the projects, and the hopes of a better life for their family only to be greeted by “DEATH” awaiting them around the next corner. Crack cocaine was marketed as “HOPE,” but there was a”DEATH” clause written in small print, but Farber’s “CRACK: Rock Cocaine, Street capitalism, and the Decade of Greed” brings the magnifying glass to help you read what you missed over the years. Continue reading A personal review of Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed by David Farber

A NOLA Chic Experience with the New Orleans Black Masking Indians-Mardi Gras Indians

Most of you have to wait until Mardi Gras Day, Super Sunday, Saint Joseph’s Day and Night, Secondline parades, and the New Orleans Jazz Festival to experience the beautiful sights and sounds of the New Orleans Black Masking Indians. But year-round, I am surrounded by native New Orleanians who ensure our treasured culture and tradition survive. With the recent cancellation of Super Sunday and the Secondline, I thought it was a great time to share my experience of growing up in New Orleans witnessed the creation, birth, and celebration of the New Orleans Black Masking Indians. Year after year, suits … Continue reading A NOLA Chic Experience with the New Orleans Black Masking Indians-Mardi Gras Indians

Café Rose Nicaud contributed to the community, character, charm, and culture of Frenchmen Street in New Orleans has closed

Café Rose Nicaud has closed its doors on December 16, 2019, after decades of contributing to the character, charm, and culture on Frenchmen Street, as well as being a vessel to bring the community together.

Cafe Rose Nicaud was dedicated to the memory of Rose Nicaud and her pioneering success as a leading entrepreneur whose resourceful spirit and extraordinary efforts continue to inspire us today. Continue reading Café Rose Nicaud contributed to the community, character, charm, and culture of Frenchmen Street in New Orleans has closed

Crack Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed By David Farber

Crack is an essential read for anyone hoping to understand why. This lively, well- researched history of America’s crack cocaine years introduces readers to entrepreneurial dealers, desperate users, and draconian drug policies. Along the way, it illuminates the era’s racism, political excesses, and media exaggerations, as well as the lasting damage crack and crack dealers wrought in countless neighborhoods of color. Continue reading Crack Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed By David Farber

ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune November 1, 1865

“ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune, America’s first Black daily, 154 years ago. “The ancients, who seem to have been more familiar than ourselves with the idea of death, and perhaps more constantly ready to meet the monster and look it in the face…” Read the full article below. “This day is devoted, among many families, to honor the memory of departed friends. The old custom will be observed this year as it has been years before. Either as the expression of a religious sentiment, or even as a social sentiment, it has a high character of morality. The … Continue reading ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune November 1, 1865

My Bittersweet Pickaninny Dolls: New Orleans Vintage Gambina Dolls, Ninkie, and Jody circa 1700s

The dolls reminded me of the painful memories and difficulties growing up in New Orleans with what I was told was the wrong color skin and bad short hair, the only difference was that “Ninkie” was cute and only because she was made in the 80. A lot of my feelings were rooted not in hatred for myself but for the absence of dolls that looked like me. Continue reading My Bittersweet Pickaninny Dolls: New Orleans Vintage Gambina Dolls, Ninkie, and Jody circa 1700s

#ThrowbackThursday – New Orleans 1990: Mardi Gras Indians photos by Infrogmation

My ”Throwback Thursday” pictures were taken by New Orleanian known as “Infrogmation or Froggy.” other than being one of New Orleans most remarkable photographers, but one can see his life’s adventures in his personal photographs. “Infrogmation is one of #nola’s … Continue reading #ThrowbackThursday – New Orleans 1990: Mardi Gras Indians photos by Infrogmation

My Nola Life-What I know and may not know about Juneteenth

I wonder why isn’t Juneteenth celebrated on a larger scale in New Orleans, primarily when the city is known to celebrate some of the strangest things. We have festivals for food, a voodoo fest, a Greek Fest, a whiskey fest, and the list of fest goes on. Is it the sensitivity of the issue at hand that has some cringing at the even written word “J.U.N.E.T.E.E.N.T.H? Is it not celebrated as it should, because some think it’s “just for black” as if white people didn’t assist in this life-changing day? Is it hard for some to accept that Slavery did happen and by way of their lineage? Can we stop avoiding “The Talk”about the day African Americans became “real people” to the government? It happened and we need to celebrate days, events such as Juneteenth together to prevent slavery from happening again. Continue reading My Nola Life-What I know and may not know about Juneteenth