A NOLA Chic Experience with the New Orleans Black Masking Indians-Mardi Gras Indians

Most of you have to wait until Mardi Gras Day, Super Sunday, Saint Joseph’s Day and Night, Secondline parades, and the New Orleans Jazz Festival to experience the beautiful sights and sounds of the New Orleans Black Masking Indians. But year-round, I am surrounded by native New Orleanians who ensure our treasured culture and tradition survive. With the recent cancellation of Super Sunday and the … Continue reading A NOLA Chic Experience with the New Orleans Black Masking Indians-Mardi Gras Indians

Café Rose Nicaud contributed to the community, character, charm, and culture of Frenchmen Street in New Orleans has closed

Café Rose Nicaud has closed its doors on December 16, 2019, after decades of contributing to the character, charm, and culture on Frenchmen Street, as well as being a vessel to bring the community together.

Cafe Rose Nicaud was dedicated to the memory of Rose Nicaud and her pioneering success as a leading entrepreneur whose resourceful spirit and extraordinary efforts continue to inspire us today. Continue reading Café Rose Nicaud contributed to the community, character, charm, and culture of Frenchmen Street in New Orleans has closed

Artist Dread Scott Organizes Reenactment Of 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt : NPR

Artist Dread Scott organized the 26-mile trek to New Orleans as a tribute to the men and women who protested their enslavement in the German Coast Uprising of 1811 by re-imagining a different outcome. On to New Orleans!” they chanted, thrusting their weapons high. “Freedom or death!” One of the participants in the reenactment, which was directed by New York performance artist Dread Scott and … Continue reading Artist Dread Scott Organizes Reenactment Of 1811 Louisiana Slave Revolt : NPR

Slave Rebellion Reenactment – November 8-9 2019

On November 8-9, 2019, hundreds of re-enactors will retrace the path of the largest rebellion of enslaved people in United States history, embodying a story of resistance, freedom and revolutionary action. — Read on http://www.slave-revolt.com/   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oct. 7, 2019 Large-Scale Performance to Reenact Biggest Rebellion of Enslaved People in U.S. History  Visionary Artist Dread Scott Leads Hundreds of Reenactors Participating In 2-Day, 26-Mile Performance in Louisiana’s River … Continue reading Slave Rebellion Reenactment – November 8-9 2019

ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune November 1, 1865

“ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune, America’s first Black daily, 154 years ago. “The ancients, who seem to have been more familiar than ourselves with the idea of death, and perhaps more constantly ready to meet the monster and look it in the face…” Read the full article below. “This day is devoted, among many families, to honor the memory of departed friends. The … Continue reading ALL SAINTS DAY,” The New Orleans Tribune November 1, 1865

My Bittersweet Pickaninny Dolls: New Orleans Vintage Gambina Dolls, Ninkie, and Jody circa 1700s

The dolls reminded me of the painful memories and difficulties growing up in New Orleans with what I was told was the wrong color skin and bad short hair, the only difference was that “Ninkie” was cute and only because she was made in the 80. A lot of my feelings were rooted not in hatred for myself but for the absence of dolls that looked like me. Continue reading My Bittersweet Pickaninny Dolls: New Orleans Vintage Gambina Dolls, Ninkie, and Jody circa 1700s

#ThrowbackThursday – New Orleans 1990: Mardi Gras Indians photos by Infrogmation

My ”Throwback Thursday” pictures were taken by New Orleanian known as “Infrogmation or Froggy.” other than being one of New Orleans most remarkable photographers, but one can see his life’s adventures in his personal photographs. “Infrogmation is one of #nola’s most unheralded great photographers.” — Kevin Allman, editor “Gambit” New Orleans weekly.[1] *blush* Feel free to read the rest of the article on The Advocate here: … Continue reading #ThrowbackThursday – New Orleans 1990: Mardi Gras Indians photos by Infrogmation

My Nola Life-What I know and may not know about Juneteenth

I wonder why isn’t Juneteenth celebrated on a larger scale in New Orleans, primarily when the city is known to celebrate some of the strangest things. We have festivals for food, a voodoo fest, a Greek Fest, a whiskey fest, and the list of fest goes on. Is it the sensitivity of the issue at hand that has some cringing at the even written word “J.U.N.E.T.E.E.N.T.H? Is it not celebrated as it should, because some think it’s “just for black” as if white people didn’t assist in this life-changing day? Is it hard for some to accept that Slavery did happen and by way of their lineage? Can we stop avoiding “The Talk”about the day African Americans became “real people” to the government? It happened and we need to celebrate days, events such as Juneteenth together to prevent slavery from happening again. Continue reading My Nola Life-What I know and may not know about Juneteenth

A conversation with a New Orleans Urban Cowboy; Michael A. Hollins aka Dat Ghetto Cowboy

Maybe you were dancing along the streets during a Second Line and noticed a group of men riding their horses up and down the neutral ground ( the “median-” You know, that little strip of land in the middle of a road.) and thought what horses have to do with the Second Line. Tourist aren’t the only ones with these questions. There are plenty of New Orleanians who do not know the full story of how these young men can saddle up and ride through our neighborhoods as if they were in the Wild Wild West. Continue reading A conversation with a New Orleans Urban Cowboy; Michael A. Hollins aka Dat Ghetto Cowboy